Climate Talks, COP23 - Fiji & Bonn, Mitigation, Paris Agreement

The honeymoon is over

This article is written by Laura Florez Urazan.

The Paris Agreement was a political success, a diplomatic milestone, and what we all thought would be the first step of a different global trajectory. It was a promising wedding among countries with different -and sometimes opposing- priorities and views.

But Marrakech and Bonn have shown that the honeymoon period is over. Parties set aside important contradictions in the negotiations to tie the knot, and now they are all bubbling back to the surface and exposing structural flaws in the implementation process. For example, there is no consensus on whether identifying new features or elaborating on existing ones represents renegotiation or not, and that is just the beginning. That is why the negotiations are moving at such a slow and uneven pace: certain items in the agenda are just too divergent.

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Climate Talks, COP23 - Fiji & Bonn, Mitigation, Paris Agreement

Why negotiations are stalling on Article 6 of the Paris Agreement at COP23 (Part 2)

This article is divided in 2 parts. Read the first part here.
This article is written by Rémy Ruat.

Halfway into the twenty-third Conference of Parties (COP23) in Bonn, negotiations on the “Article 6 rulebook” of the Paris Agreement are stalling. The first draft prepared by the chairs was welcomed with protests from several parties. In spite of numerous exchanges ahead of COP23, it is still unclear what the possible outcome could look like. We covered in the first part of this article the stakes of these negotiations regarding transparency, collective ambition and the role of non-state actors. We will try now to decrypt where the conflict lies and the potential leads suggested by parties and experts.

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Climate Talks, COP23 - Fiji & Bonn, Mitigation, Paris Agreement

3 reasons to get interested in the fate of Article 6 of the #ParisAgreement at #COP23 (Part 1)

Before reading this article, if you are not familiar with carbon market mechanisms, here is a suggested read which will help you understand the jargon. Thank you for reading!
This article is divided in 2 parts. Read the second part here.
This article is written by Rémy Ruat.

The twenty-third Conference of Parties (COP23) of the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which takes place currently in Bonn under a Fijian presidency, is a highly technical one. One might think the political stakes behind these discussions are low. One would be wrong : a crucial question needs to be answered by Parties : how can they raise collective ambition in the implementation of the Paris Agreement?

Entrance to the « Bonn Zone » of COP23, where side-events are held

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Climate Talks, Paris Agreement

Always Forward, Never Backward: The Facilitative Dialogue, Global Stocktake and the Ambition Mechanism of the Paris Agreement

This article is written by Mark Ortiz.

Picture1It is well known that the first round of Paris Agreement pledges would substantially overshoot the accord’s long-term temperature targets. If the first Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) were the end of the line, the planet would roast!

Fortunately, the initial pledges are far from final. The Paris Agreement is designed to encourage stronger commitments over time through a feature that has become known as the ambition mechanism. This mechanism aims to progressively increase – or “ratchet-up” – the ambition of country plans in order to realize the Agreement’s long-term goals of limiting temperature rise to “well below 2 degrees C” and achieving a net-zero emissions scenario by the second half of this century.

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Carbon Footprint, Carbon Markets, Climate Politics, Paris Agreement

The development of carbon markets – and what they have become

This article is written by Birte Kurbjeweit.

The if and how of carbon markets is a heavily discussed issue in climate politics. Supporters of carbon markets argue that emissions trading systems are the most liberal and economic form of carbon reduction while strengthening the economy. Opponents on the other hand refer to the rather inefficient carbon markets set up by the Kyoto Protocol and the EU’s Emission Trading System (ETS), where the emission limits were set too high and carbon prices too low to incite green development. Additionally, through carbon offset programs polluters have been given the opportunity to make money in carbon markets.

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Climate Talks, Paris Agreement

The Principle of Differentiation: reflections and changes since the Paris Agreement

This article is written by Chrysa Alexandraki.

The principle of Common But Differentiated Responsibilities and Respective Capabilities (CBDRRC) is embodied in Art. 3.1 UNFCCC[1] as one of the core principles of the Convention. The CBDRRC principle resulted from the ‘application of equity in general international law’[2]and the rationale was to ‘enable negotiators to agree on an international legal framework for climate policy during the 1990s’[3]. The principle provides a dichotomous architecture characterizing the Convention and consists of two basic aspects:

  • All countries have a common responsibility to reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in order to combat climate change.
  • However, not all States have the same responsibility. The principle sets a differentiation between developed countries (Annex I Parties) on the one hand which have contributed to the GHG emissions on a major scale since the industrial era and the developing countries (non-Annex I Parties) on the other hand still struggling to develop.

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Climate Finance, Green Fund, Paris Agreement

Climate funds lost in translation

This article is written by Côme Girschig.

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Climate is a tricky issue on many aspects because philosophers, biologists, journalists, chemists, CEOs, physicians, lawyers, doctors, or writers, all have a different definitions of the matter. Even finance experts joined the game, and their work didn’t make the whole thing simpler.

The first conference I went to, in Bonn, was a workshop on long-term climate finance. Let’s be clear: my economic and finance background has been useless and I rapidly got lost among the acronyms. Proud to master each letter of “UNFCCC”, I got punched in the face by NAPAs, GCF, NAPs, CIFs, MDBs, LDCF, LULUCF, REDD+…

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